Sunday, August 02, 2009

No tears here for Cory Aquino

Aquino was sick for over a year and passed away Friday. I don't think so many Filipinos have cried together since Manny Pacquiao's 2005 loss to Erik Morales. But the truth is that tears are being shed unnecessarily for someone who did so much damage to that country.

I'm reminded of that line from "JFK": "They're bawling like they knew the man. Makes me want to puke." It's one thing to weep over someone you actually know, but the vast majority of Filipinos are weeping over someone whose "legacy" is nothing more than a fanciful construction. She was the Philippines' equivalent of Jimmy Carter: a seemingly "nice" person, pleasant in appearance, but incompetent, and forgettable except that she succeeded a completely corrupt president.

The housewife's only "qualification" to seek the Philippine presidency was that her husband, Benigno Aquino, then-president Ferdinand Marcos' chief rival, had been assassinated a few years earlier. It would have been fine had she done no more than lead the "People Power Revolution" that eventually toppled Marcos, step down disappear into private life. That would have been a legacy worth remembering, but she believed she could actually wield real power over people.

Her efforts at economic controls did nothing but set back what private progress struggled to achieve in the post-war years. Marcos' attempts to force rapid development were bad enough, taxing the productive (and borrowing from foreigners) to "invest" in his pet projects, but Aquino did much the same thing. Her "land reform" purported to break up the huge lands held by the "oligarchy" and redistribute them to the lower classes, but history had already proven by 1986 the inevitable disastrous results of central planning. Moreover, as oppressive as the wealthiest Filipino landowners have been for centuries (mini-tyrants during Spanish colonial rule, and corrupt today via vote-buying), the "reforms" also targeted honest families who happened to amass more than a few hectares. So this was hardly "taking back from the rich what they stole from the poor."

Her Executive Order 229 of July 22, 1987 implemented the "Comprehensive Agrarian Reform Program" of her earlier Presidential Proclamation 131. History had already proven the inevitable disastrous results of central planning, but Aquino had promised "agrarian reform," and her administration thought they could devise a way. Department Administrative Order #3, issued in October 1987, required compulsory registration of lands and estimated production. The only purpose for a government to know such things is so that it can exercise control; nothing less. It also included the onerous provision: "The citizenry, in general, and farmer's organizations and other non-governmental organizations in particular, will be encouraged to participate in the campaign, particularly in creating social pressurs on those who, intentionally or otherwise, do not register or declare false information."

Then Republic Act 6657, passed on June 10, 1988, applied reforms to all lands, including privately owned land: the landowner would be "allowed" to keep five hectares (about 12 and a third acres), and each child over 15 who was actively working or managing the land could keep three hectares. The government would let the families choose which sections of the land -- how gracious!

Then there's the price tag, originally set at 50 billion pesos -- approximately U.S. $2.4 billion, a huge amount for such an impoverished country! The money was needed partially for administration, and mainly to "compensate" landowners (hence the registration requirements mentioned above) for what was seized. How did Aquino propose to pay for it? No problem, because her people had a plan: recipients of the land transfers would have to buy the land outright, via 30-year loans at 6% interest from the government. The government would be making money there, and Aquino's administration figured that any losses could be covered by...foreign aid!

The Philippines still suffers today. Current president Arroyo has her windmills, and she's destroyed food production by encouraging ethanol: farmers are turning from rice and vegetables to sugarcane, which would otherwise not be as profitable, but now Arroyo's government is giving them money. Is it any wonder that sugar and rice production have gotten worse, forcing the Philippines to import both? It's true: the Philippines must import sugar, and it's the biggest rice importer among Asian countries. It's not just the growing population, or the lower production compared to American farms with advanced machinery. It's all the government intervention, from "encouraging" less profitable industries to outright property seizure. Similar to Zimbabwe, the government "redistributed" land to those who didn't know the first thing about managing agriculture. Because government placed its own valuations on land, people could no longer make a rational decision between, say, continuing to plant sugarcane or building a house.

Even so, there were ways around the land redistribution. A family could incorporate its holdings and then transfer shares of stock in lieu of giving up actual land. By transferring no more than a minority of the shares outstanding, the family could retain effective control. Aquino's own family, the powerful Cojuangcos, were the first to use this trick. Suits were filed against them, but the Philippine courts conveniently dismissed the litigation. Meanwhile, the smaller, still-wealthy families had neither the loopholes nor the political connections to preserve their holdings. "Reform," then, was a perfect means for the biggest landowners to drive out their mid-size competitors.

And yet this woman is being remembered, and will probably be remembered for decades to come, as incorruptible and some sort of saint. Unbelievably, she's been compared to Joan of Arc.

Millions of Filipinos will disagree with this, and they won't want to hear this, but the truth hurts.

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14 Comments:

Blogger jk said...

But she is remembered for the flower revolution and guiding the country from the Marcoses' kleptocracy to an inchoate functioning democracy.

A bit like the French celebrating Bastille Day, they broke out of a bad system of government. Even though both countries have had a tough time finding a good replacement, they celebrate throwing off the old shackles.

Tuesday, August 04, 2009 12:08:00 PM  
Blogger Perry Eidelbus said...

That's a good comparison to Bastille Day: remembering something not at all in the way it actually happened. The Bastille guards effectively opened the doors; there was hardly any need to "storm" it.

Tuesday, August 04, 2009 6:42:00 PM  
Blogger Blogbug said...

I agree with JK, Perry Eidelbus. It doesn't matter if Cory was an ordinary housewife, hesitant to be a president and did not do much for the country. The thing is, she represented freedom from everything supressed in the Philippines. Be kind and grateful. I would.

Monday, August 10, 2009 2:49:00 PM  
Blogger Perry Eidelbus said...

Then you have no idea who she was, Blogbug, or who the Cojuangcos and Aquinos are.

It doesn't matter if someone is a housewife. It doesn't matter if someone is dead. If she screws up a country, if she does her own part to ruin the economy by imposing "reforms," then the people have every right to hold her responsible. And if the people do not, God most certainly will.

She represented nothing about freedom. Her own regime engaged in plenty of economic and political suppression, but after all, it's a country where a few pesos per person will get you plenty of protestors about a cause they know nothing about (and don't care to know anything about). And look now, even her supporters want to shut Willie (and me) down. When they can't shut us down with the force of government, they try to shout us down.

Their tactics won't work. I will never shy away from the truth.

Monday, August 10, 2009 6:40:00 PM  
Blogger Blogbug said...

No one is trying to shut you down. People are just voicing their opinion, same as what you are doing. I don't think there is any difference between you and your friend Willy and the illiterate people that you are labelling. You just happen to be on different sides of the fence. And if you paid more attention - it was called the EDSA Revolution (Were you there anyway? Or were you sitting on top of a carabao?) In Filipino language "langaw na nakatuntong sa kalabaw". But judging by the looks of your profile pic, you seem to be larger than a "langaw". Tsk tsk.
Anyway, it was a revolution so being an ordinary housewife was out of the question. We needed a symbol for freedom and that was what she brought us whether your "langaw" state would like it or not. In the same light, I wouldn't blame you if you prefer to be on Willy's side. After all, the only difference between the two of you is that you are more articulate and knowledgeable and he's not. But basically, you have the same values in life, I would observe.
Yes, you are right in a way. "Her own regime engaged in plenty of economic and political suppression". But then again, that was not Cory. She is still seated in the kinder platform. She is excused from every mistake she's made because the people who voted for her in the first place knew that she did not have the slightest idea of good politics and leadership. She was a plain housewife, what is there to expect? That, again, brings us back to the fact that she was just a symbol of our freedom. It was up to the learned men in politics under her wing to make or break the situation of our country way back then. And it was also up to the people who claimed reform and reconciliation to follow and abide by the rules in order to put things in order in our country. In other words, teamwork - but hey! there was none. Some were contented living in the slums, some were happy stealing from other people and the others were just happy sulking in the background, in their little hidden corners of the world trying their best to lambast the government they could not even handle, just like you. I'll bet if you had the balls, you would have been in Congress right now expressing your dis-satisfaction. But I guess some people can only do so much. So that's understandable. Cheer up, loosen up - it might do you good. :-)

Thursday, August 20, 2009 2:22:00 PM  
Blogger Perry Eidelbus said...

"No one is trying to shut you down. People are just voicing their opinion, same as what you are doing."

That's far from the truth, and I suspect you know it, though I'd like to give you the benefit of the doubt and think you simply cannot see rather than refuse to see. You don't have to see the huge volume of hate mail I've received, whether about this, defending Willie or (gasp) daring to say the least thing against Charice. You only need to see the hateful comments that show that they want freedom of speech and conscience, but they don't think I should have it simply because I don't agree.

It's the same mob mentality, this wonderful "Filipino democratic process" whereby numbers are used to triumph over reason and individuals. That will not work with me. I will not give in.

"I don't think there is any difference between you and your friend Willy and the illiterate people that you are labelling. You just happen to be on different sides of the fence."

Willie is not my friend. I can't even say that I personally liked him, although he makes U.S. game show hosts look amateurish, and now I'm a big fan because of what happened to him.

"And if you paid more attention - it was called the EDSA Revolution"

Actually, if you paid attention, it's called both. I would tell you not to be so pedantic, but being pedantic implies actually being right.

I know it happened at EDSA, because, you know, we watched it all happen on American TV news, shaking our heads at the idiotic rallies. It was then that my father taught me that all it takes is a few pesos per person, especially children, and you'll have an army to carry posters and chant whatever you want. And today, every time we're in Manila and go along the road, I mock the events that happened two decades ago.

There is a specific reason I don't use EDSA to refer to it: I call it the "People Power Revolution," with quotation marks, to mock it. The quotation marks indicate sarcasm.

"(Were you there anyway? Or were you sitting on top of a carabao?) In Filipino language "langaw na nakatuntong sa kalabaw"."

Thankfully I was not there. What, you think I'm 100% Pinoy? I'm an American who happens to have Filipino blood, and thankfully I grew up in the United States.

Here's a saying for you, something we Fil-Am have about where our families came from: "the armpit of Asia."

Thursday, August 20, 2009 9:37:00 PM  
Blogger Perry Eidelbus said...

"But judging by the looks of your profile pic, you seem to be larger than a "langaw". Tsk tsk."

It's a four-year-old picture, taken 40 pounds ago. Does that give you an idea of how foolish you look now? If you want to see a better picture, look here.

So now it's your turn: let's see a picture of your pangit mukha, if you dare.

"Anyway, it was a revolution so being an ordinary housewife was out of the question. We needed a symbol for freedom and that was what she brought us whether your "langaw" state would like it or not."

Just because it was a "revolution" does not make it automatically good. The French had their "revolution," as have many other countries who continued to experience tyranny (albeit in a different form).

What you were looking for is the same stupid mistake that Third Worlders have done in every other "people power revolutions": a blank slate that you think can be what you want and/or need, someone who will promise prosperity and freedom but has no clue on how to deliver it -- or someone who pretends to be that blank slate but has no intention to deliver the promised freedom. This is like what's said about desperate American girls: "Not Mr. Right, but Mr. Right Now."

"In the same light, I wouldn't blame you if you prefer to be on Willy's side. After all, the only difference between the two of you is that you are more articulate and knowledgeable and he's not. But basically, you have the same values in life, I would observe."

I am not on "Willy's side." I am always and consistently on the side of freedom.

There is a saying, made by a disciple of Voltaire: "I may disagree with what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it." It doesn't matter if Willie is in the U.S., the Philippines or Singapore: he has his God-given rights. I'm pretty sure you don't believe in them.

"Yes, you are right in a way. "Her own regime engaged in plenty of economic and political suppression". But then again, that was not Cory. She is still seated in the kinder platform. She is excused from every mistake she's made because the people who voted for her in the first place knew that she did not have the slightest idea of good politics and leadership. She was a plain housewife, what is there to expect?"

You sound as ignorant as my mother, who still absolves the Marcoses for the killings and detainments. "That was not them, that was all from their cronies."

If Aquino was "just a housewife," then you should have expected the very worst. My family did: we were proven right that she'd leave office with the country in a wreck.

Her "nice" appearance was a facade. It doesn't matter if she's remembered for being uncorruptible and as nice as Jimmy Carter. Both of them did more than sufficient damage by being incompetent, by being so sure of their (lack of) ability to heal the land.

"That, again, brings us back to the fact that she was just a symbol of our freedom. It was up to the learned men in politics under her wing to make or break the situation of our country way back then. And it was also up to the people who claimed reform and reconciliation to follow and abide by the rules in order to put things in order in our country. In other words, teamwork - but hey! there was none."

So you're saying she wasn't this great leader that all her other supporters say she is. In other words, she was a useless figurehead who didn't actually do anything (and couldn't even if she wanted).

So tell us, what was your "revolution" all about in the end? Overthrowing one tyrant so you can be directly ruled by the oligarchy?

Thursday, August 20, 2009 9:39:00 PM  
Blogger Perry Eidelbus said...

"Some were contented living in the slums, some were happy stealing from other people and the others were just happy sulking in the background, in their little hidden corners of the world trying their best to lambast the government they could not even handle,"

In other words, life went on unchanged for most Filipinos.

"just like you."

That's absurd phrasing on your part, but unsurprising considering you're grasping at straws. There's nothing about the government I "could not even handle." I just happen to be in my home country, pointing out the problems in the country that some of my family was born in.

"I'll bet if you had the balls, you would have been in Congress right now expressing your dis-satisfaction. But I guess some people can only do so much. So that's understandable."

As a matter of fact, I couldn't, since, uh, I'm not a Philippine citizen. I'm an American.

And even were I a Philippine citizen, why would I bother running for office? When was the last time you saw a national candidate win on a platform of individual freedom? My opinions would make me cannon fodder for the Aquinos and Cojuangcos, who would ensure I'd lose (same old tricks of ballot stuffing, vote buying, and if necessary, outright intimidation). Look at how they've forced Willie off the air, for saying "offensive" words that weren't offensive in the least.

I have a brother-in-law who tried running for vice mayor, but he had no chance. It was decided by greater powers that he and the mayor would lose. One day, several gunmen shot and nearly killed the mayor's bodyguard, and my bayaw realized it was a hopeless cause. If it happened tomorrow, it still wouldn't be the last corrupt election in the country.

"Cheer up, loosen up - it might do you good. :-)"

When it comes to arguing and fighting for freedom, there's no time to "cheer up." Maybe if you're a farmer or Subic Bay puta whose life won't be any different, you can afford to sit back.

As for me, the cause of freedom keeps my mind sharp and my blood hot.

Thursday, August 20, 2009 9:39:00 PM  
Blogger Blogbug said...

My oh my Perry Eidelbus! You are indeed a very interesting character. You think I was posting my comments here to have an argument or a fight with you. Well, sorry to disappoint you my dear sulking boy but that was not my intention. It just so happened that someone mentioned about a Pinoy who is writing against Tita Cory. And I wanted to see for myself the character of the writer - which is you of course. Aaaww and so cute of you to even show an updated photo of you and your charming and homely looking partner, which is not so different by the way from the first one. Thanks for sharing!:-) And you even took the time to go to a photo studio at Great Image (which, by the way, is baduy or commercial studio for me). I can see now why you're so upset. You're one of those kids who never really got a good break in society in the Philippines or the homeland that you call United States.
Well, I guess I’m done here. From now on I will probably just be a reader fan who once in a while will drop by your blog space and see if there’s anything interesting in your stories. First of all, you are far from credible to write about or against the Philippines and its people because you’re an American that looks very much like a native Pinoy, by the way, tsk tsk! There’s a name for it, I think it’s um “trying hard”. Your nose is “pango” and your skin is “kayumanggi” and there’s not even a hint of Caucasian feature in you. Here’s a saying: If Philippines is the armpit of Asia, Perry Eidelbus is the “maitim na singit” of the US. Oh, you could pass for a Mexican though because you’re a bit on the heavy side. So, anyway – so much for your Fil-Am physical attributes. Oh and what a proud American you are! Question is: does America even give a shit about you, hmmm? To them, you are still an immigrant American. Wouldn’t that make you a “puta ng kano”? Here now, here now, be still my sulking boy. So, I’m not going to discuss anything about Tita Cory, the Philippine government and the EDSA Revolution with you anymore because you were not even there. I am proud to say that I was there and I know the sacred truth of what happened in the 1986 people power, the only EDSA revolution I know by the way (the rest are just copycats). And that truth is something that you do not deserve to know.
So, good luck, carry on with your whining, I mean fight (for what? I don’t know!). Have fun and keep all of us entertained, especially with your Willie’s and Charice’s. Sorry to hear about your hate mails. I wouldn’t waste my time on that if I were those people. Don’t they see what a good form of entertainment you are?
P.S. By the way, I would like to make mention that I do have a good educational background but prefer not to mention my universities. Sorry to disappoint you but I’m not a “puta from subic” but would love to be a Farmer. Hopefully, I can get myself a farm someday when I retire from work. Hugs and kisses to you my sulking boy! Hope you realize that you are loved. Again, cheer up and loosen up.

Friday, August 21, 2009 10:27:00 AM  
Blogger Perry Eidelbus said...

My oh my Perry Eidelbus! You are indeed a very interesting character.

Most people do.

You think I was posting my comments here to have an argument or a fight with you.

Actually, no. But you expressed your opinion, and I'm going to rebit.

Well, sorry to disappoint you my dear sulking boy but that was not my intention. It just so happened that someone mentioned about a Pinoy who is writing against Tita Cory. And I wanted to see for myself the character of the writer - which is you of course.

There's nothing "sulking" about me. So let me guess, one of your friends left a comment, I came down hard, and she complained to you about some mean person.

Aaaww and so cute of you to even show an updated photo of you and your charming and homely looking partner,

That should have been "comely."

which is not so different by the way from the first one.

What "first one"? Or do you mean the original, terrible scan?

If you refer to my blog header picture, my face is actually very different from the weight loss.

Thanks for sharing!:-) And you even took the time to go to a photo studio at Great Image (which, by the way, is baduy or commercial studio for me).

That's your opinion, and a lone one, considering GI is stil in business. In our case, the picture was taken a couple of years ago. We were visiting my family and needed to kill time at S&M before the movie started. We thought it would be fun, and it turns out that the photographer was superb. I'd recommend them a million times.

Saturday, August 22, 2009 4:45:00 PM  
Blogger Perry Eidelbus said...

I can see now why you're so upset. You're one of those kids who never really got a good break in society in the Philippines or the homeland that you call United States.

You know zilch about me. I was born there and...that was about it. Now, since my father was an American ex-pat, we lived in basically every exclusive area of Metro Manila that you can name. My parents had their Valley Golf membership (is it still as exclusive?) and went to all the fancy restaurants. My sister and I went to private schools, had our own driver, and were about as privileged as you could get. So you have, uh, no clue whatsoever when you wonder if I "never really got a good break" there.

Now as far the United States, it's a matter of what I've accomplished as an individual. You wouldn't understand that.

Well, I guess I’m done here. From now on I will probably just be a reader fan who once in a while will drop by your blog space and see if there’s anything interesting in your stories.

You may not want to bother. I talk a lot of politics and economics that are beyond your ability to comprehend.

First of all, you are far from credible to write about or against the Philippines and its people because you’re an American that looks very much like a native Pinoy, by the way, tsk tsk!

What utter hypocrisy on your part, and it's sad that you'll never understand it.

There’s a name for it, I think it’s um “trying hard”.

What, your attempts here to belittle me? I suppose you're trying hard, just not succeeding.

Your nose is “pango” and your skin is “kayumanggi” and there’s not even a hint of Caucasian feature in you.

Once again, you're so wrong by being so quick to judge. I have my mother's "tomato" nose, but the shape of my face came from my father; I have a close male relative on that side who has strikingly similar features, just not the nose.

As far as my tan, there actually wasn't much in the picture, but I do brown quickly every time we go back.

So where's your picture, puta?

Here’s a saying: If Philippines is the armpit of Asia, Perry Eidelbus is the “maitim na singit” of the US.

Aw, did you come up with that all by yourself? Or did you get that because that's what you're called in your home village? I could see how that's your childhood nickname, based on the chafing alone.

Oh, you could pass for a Mexican though because you’re a bit on the heavy side. So, anyway – so much for your Fil-Am physical attributes.

Actually Mexicans tend to be small and shorter, notwithstanding my physiognomy is nothing like theirs. But we already knew that you're ignorant of anything outside your little country. You're probably like most Filipinos and think all white people look the same.

Saturday, August 22, 2009 4:54:00 PM  
Blogger Perry Eidelbus said...

Oh and what a proud American you are!

There are things here that I am proud of, and other things I am not proud of. Now, what about your country could you possibly be proud of? Besides the fruit exports.

Question is: does America even give a shit about you, hmmm? To them, you are still an immigrant American.

You know nothing about the United States. Since I never had any accent but a pure American one, I'm just like the millions of other Asians who are, you know, American. What you don't understand and probably never will is that, unlike "Filipino," "American" is not a matter of genetics.

What you also don't understand is that "the Philippines" would never "give a shit" about you or anyone else. By contrast, "America" doesn't "give a shit" about me -- and doesn't need to. Since this is a country that at least used to be based on individualism, my accomplishments speak for themselves.

Wouldn’t that make you a “puta ng kano”?

Actually, no, but you can call me a "mix" or "mestizo" if you'd like.

Here now, here now, be still my sulking boy. So, I’m not going to discuss anything about Tita Cory, the Philippine government and the EDSA Revolution with you anymore because you were not even there.

Because I speak the truth, you can't counter it. That's the bottom line.

I'm sure you won't understand this simple point of logic, but you don't need to have "been there" at any historical event to know what happened. Or don't you know how history books are written?

What happened 20 years ago at Tiananmen Square? You weren't there. I wasn't. Yet we know very well what happened.

I am proud to say that I was there and I know the sacred truth of what happened in the 1986 people power, the only EDSA revolution I know by the way (the rest are just copycats). And that truth is something that you do not deserve to know.

Ha, whatever. Just like millions of Filipinos (even those too young) have claimed for 60 years that they were on the Bataan Death March?

So tell us what happened. Someone gave you five pesos to carry a banner and shout "Cory!" all day long? It's one thing to go around and babble "revolution" over and over. It's another thing to depose one bad government and replace it with a good one, which unfortunately Filipinos did not do.

As far as "truth," go ahead and tell us. Why are you so afraid to tell us, instead cowering behind excuses? Yeah, "you do not deserve to know." You sound just like religious inquisitors. What, is your family somewhat powerful where you are, and you drove out someone who dared to disagree? Does it hurt you that someone actually disagrees and lives somewhere where you have no power to silence him?

The irony is that it's my job here to expose the history of your "revolution," as its currently recorded, as a fraud in principle. The events are not deniable, nor am I trying. But the motives behind everything are what are not commonly known -- especially to you.

So, good luck, carry on with your whining, I mean fight (for what? I don’t know!).

Like I said, I speak the truth, and you can't counter it. You can only resort to insults, instead of presenting your own arguments.

If you don't know what I "fight" for in the United States, then you really know nothing about what's happening here. Stop relying on Balitang America, which presents only snippets and very one-sided viewpoints.

You can't be called "ironic," because you're just hypocritical. You dare to say I don't know anything about what happens there, but in fact I know far more about there than you do here. So will you follow your own principles and huwag ka mag salita about American matters?

Saturday, August 22, 2009 4:58:00 PM  
Blogger Perry Eidelbus said...

Have fun and keep all of us entertained, especially with your Willie’s and Charice’s.

If you are "entertained," then you are so only in your ignorance.

You, however, can keep demonstrating to me and my readers the sorry, shallow nature of the modern, politically active, self-righteous Filipino.

Sorry to hear about your hate mails. I wouldn’t waste my time on that if I were those people. Don’t they see what a good form of entertainment you are?

Which is, in fact, no different than the comments you're leaving here. But we already knew you're a hypocrite.

P.S. By the way, I would like to make mention that I do have a good educational background but prefer not to mention my universities.

Riiiiiight. Forgive the rest of us for being skeptical.

Sorry to disappoint you but I’m not a “puta from subic” but would love to be a Farmer. Hopefully, I can get myself a farm someday when I retire from work.

If that's your dream, then do whatever floats your boat. Americans, however, tend to have better aspirations than retiring to farm life.

Hugs and kisses to you my sulking boy! Hope you realize that you are loved. Again, cheer up and loosen up.

Sorry lady, but I'm already married.

Saturday, August 22, 2009 5:00:00 PM  
Blogger Rey said...

hi perry,

thanks for standing up for what is truth. how much does our life improve with the Aquino government? people claim of her as symbol of freedom from tyranny, maybe i can give them that but did it translate to our development as a nation. i don't think so because it started our nations downfall as one of asia's better nations. how much manila know about people's plight in the rural areas in her time. in her government, i see lots of corruption and a disorganized government. if marcos plundered our country for years, they did it in months and fewer years.

Monday, August 31, 2009 3:35:00 PM  

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